Thursday, 22 September 2016

  Arthritis Topic This Week (Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome) Other Arthritis-like Diseases
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Thanks to C. Williams, Hamilton, Ontario, CA for sharing
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ARTHRITIS
       
“Failure is success if you learned from it.” Malcolm Forbes





Other Arthritis-like Diseases (Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome)

In my last few blogs, I covered many arthritis-like diseases that affect children and/or adults. Today I will discuss Adrenal Fatigue Syndromewhich is a disease that can cause joint and body pain, but is not classes as arthritis. I explained that arthritis is a general term used to cover over 100 diseases of the musculoskeletal system that affect the joints, muscles, bones, cartilage, and connective tissues.

About Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome
Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome is a term used for a collection of non-specific group of symptoms including body aches and pains, digestive problems, sleep deprivation, nervousness, and fatigue, although it is not an official medical terminology. Adrenal fatigue has many symptoms like Addison’s Disease, but there are tests to diagnose Addison’s, which is an autoimmune disease, but there are no specific tests or markers for adrenal fatigue that is recognized by the medical profession.
The adrenal glands are the body’s alert system in fight or flight situations. Low levels of adrenal hormones make the body unable to be sufficiently aroused to respond in emergency situations.
The adrenal glands produce a variety of hormones that are essential for us to live and survive. The term adrenal insufficiency or (Addison’s Disease), refers to the body’s inability to produce adequate amounts of one or more of these hormones, usually because of some underlying medical causes. Adrenal fatigue acts like a mild form of adrenal insufficiency which is caused by chronic stress. But adrenal in sufficiency can be treated with hormones to replace the levels, while adrenal fatigue has no such specific treatment.
 Adrenal fatigue can also occur after chronic infections like bronchitis, pneumonia, and influenza. Though there may not be any readily identifiable symptoms, people with adrenal fatigue live with tiredness and a general feeling of unwellness.

Symptoms of Adrenal Insufficiency Include:
  • Fatigue
  • Body aches and pains
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Loss of body hair
  • Low blood pressure
  • Lightheadedness
  • Hyperpigmentation (skin discoloration)
  • Trouble thinking clearly


Symptoms of Adrenal Fatigue
  • Constant feeling of tiredness and fatigue
  • Dry skin
  • Frequent urination
  • Joint and body pain
  • Dark circles under the eyes
  • Loss of muscle tone
  • Low blood pressure
  • Low blood sugar
  • Loss of body hair
  • Dizziness
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Trouble getting out of bed, even after a good night’s sleep
  • Low sex drive
  • Depression
  • Problems with digestion
  • Increased craving for salt and sugar
  •  Irregular period
  • Extreme sensitivity to cold

Causes
Ongoing stress over a long period that is not addressed, combined with poor diet  and poor sleep habits
Diagnosis
The doctor will do blood tests, and special stimulation tests to check for adrenal levels in the body. But most doctors are not aware of adrenal fatigue.
Treatment
While there is no prescribed treatment for adrenal fatigue. There are some common sense ways to help reduce the symptoms such as:
  • Avoiding conflict and stressful situations
  • Prayer and meditation
  • Forgiveness
  • Thinking loving thoughts
  • Eating a balanced diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables (preferably organic)
  • Avoid coffee, alcohol, and other stimulants.
  • Getting adequate sleep (try to go to bed at the same time each night).
  • Getting adequate exercise
  • Drink enough water

Ask your health care provider about vitamins and supplements that aid the adrenal glands and help diminish symptoms.
I hope this information has been helpful.
  • ·         IF THE ABOVE INFORMATION HAS BEEN HELPFUL, PLEASE LEAVE ME A            QUESTION OR COMMENT AT: info@askphyllis.com 
  • ·         CHECK OUT MY ARCHIVES FOR MORE INFO ABOUT ARTHRITIS TOPICS. 
  • ·         STAY TUNED FOR MY NEXT BLOG ON ARTHRITIS 
  • ·         DON’T FORGET TO TELL A FRIEND ABOUT MY BLOG


Reference sources include:
www.mayoclinic.org/,,,/addision.,,,/adrenalfatigue; https”//adrenalfatigue.org/what-is-adrenal-fatigue; www.webmed.com/a-to-z-guides/features/adrenal-fatigue/is-it-real;
www.global healing center.com/what-is-adrenal-fatigue’; https://adrenalfatiguesolution.com/adrenal-fatigue-symptoms;
https://www.verywell.con/adrenal-fatigue-exhaustion...;


Thursday, 18 August 2016

Arthritis Topic This Week (Churg Strauss Syndrome) Other Arthritis-like Diseases
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Thanks to A. Dean of Ottawa, Canada, for sharing
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Tips and Hints for Daily Living; and Learn an Unusual Word


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ARTHRITIS
       
“The best part of beauty is that which no picture can take.”
Sir. Francis Bacon





Other Arthritis-like Diseases (Churg Strauss Syndrome or Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangitis).

In my last few blogs, I covered many arthritis-like diseases that affect children and/or adults. Today I will discuss Churg-Strauss Syndrome which is a disease that can cause joint pain, but is not classes as arthritis. I explained that arthritis is a general term used to cover over 100 diseases of the musculoskeletal system that affect the joints, muscles, bones, cartilage, and connective tissues.

About Churg-Strauss Syndrome  ( Now called: Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangitis).
Churg-Strauss Syndrome was discovered by Dr. Jacob Churg, and Dr. Lotte Strauss in 1951. It is a rare autoimmune disease affecting 11-13 people per million.  Churg-Strauss causes inflammation of the small to medium-sized arteries in the body. It is also known as vasculitis. Churg-Strauss syndrome is characterized by an abnormal invasion of white blood cells which cluster together in the lungs and different parts of the body as painful inflammatory nodule lesions, which are called granulomatosis. 
Asthma is one of the first signs that Churg-Strauss syndrome is present, but having asthma does not necessarily mean that you have Churg-Strauss syndrome. These inflammatory legions produced by Churg-Strauss can cause impaired blood flow to many vital organs and tissues of the body resulting temporary or permanent damage to the different organs and tissues. In addition to asthma, a person could have hay fever, a rash, gastro-intestinal bleeding, and severe pain and numbness in the hands and feet.
The disease affects males and fem ales alike, usually between the ages of 40-65 years of age, though reports show that males are slightly more affected than females. Children are hardly ever affected by Churg-Strauss syndrome.
There are three stages of Churg-Strauss Syndrome:
Stage 1: The Allergic Stage:
Asthma develops about 3 to 9 years before other symptoms of the disease start showing. Asthma may also develop later on, but it does not necessarily mean that the person has Churg-Strauss. However, in people who already have asthma, Churg-Strauss will usually make the asthma worse.
Hay Fever which affects the mucous membrane of the nose, causing runny nose and sneezing.
Sinus pain and inflammation: The person may experience facial pain, and soft non-cancerous nasal polyps.
 Stage 2: Eosinophilic Stage
An eosinophil is a white blood cell that normally helps the immune system to fight infections. In Churg-Strauss, the body develops an abnormal amount of white blood cells which can cause serious damage. Symptoms of this over-production of white blood cells include:

Symptoms
Fever
Loss of appetite
Weight Loss
Asthma
Fatigue
Abdominal pain
Cough
Gastrointestinal bleeding

Stage 3: Vasculitis Stage

In this last stage, there is severe inflammation, and narrowing of blood vessels which causes a reduction of blood flow to vital organs and tissues throughout the body, including the heart, skin, muscles, peripheral nervous system, bones, and digestive tract, and sometimes the kidneys. During this phase the patient may feel generally unwell; have swollen lymph nodes, and fatigue.

Depending on the organs affected, the patient may also have the following symptoms:

Symptoms

Skin rash or sores
Joint pain and swelling
Severe pain, numbness, and tingling in hands and feet
Diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting
Severe abdominal pain
Shortness of breath from asthma or congestive heart failure
Coughing up blood
Chest pains
Irregular heart beat
Blood in the urine

Causes
The cause of Churg-Strauss is unknown. Doctors suspect that genetics play a role, or that an overactive immune system is triggered by a combination of allergies and reaction to certain medications.
Diagnosis
The doctor will do a physical evaluation, blood test, urine tests, and other diagnostic tests, including biopsies, lung function, heart tests,  X-rays, and CT scans to determine if a person has Churg-Strauss.
Treatment
There is no cure for Churg-Strauss Syndrome. Corticosteroids and other medicines are used to control the symptoms of the disease.
Prognosis

Patients who receive treatment early often do better than those treated later. Most go into remission after 5 years, and may live relatively normal lives, though they should be monitored by their doctor, and they should report any new symptoms they may experience. People who have involvement with the heart, brain, gut, and kidneys are at a higher risk and may require more intense treatment. About 50% of patients with vasculitis may experience relapses
I hope this information has been helpful.

  • ·         IF THE ABOVE INFORMATION HAS BEEN HELPFUL, PLEASE LEAVE ME A QUESTION OR COMMENT AT: info@askphyllis.com
  •          CHECK OUT MY ARCHIVES FOR MORE INFO ABOUT ARTHRITIS TOPICS.
  •           STAY TUNED FOR MY NEXT BLOG ON ARTHRITIS
  •          DON’T FORGET TO TELL A FRIEND ABOUT MY BLOG


Reference sources include:

www.cssassociation.org; www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/churg-strauss...; rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/churg-strauss-syndrome;
my.clevelandclinic.org/services…/diseases…/hic-churg-strauss-syndrome; www.vasculitis.org/uk.about-vasculitis/churg-strauss-syndrome




Thursday, 4 August 2016





                         
Arthritis Topic of The Week: Hepatitis D

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Thanks to P. Atkins of Ashville, NC, USA, for sharing
your recipe with Ask Phyllis

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ARTHRITIS
       
“The best preparation for tomorrow is doing your best today.”
H. Jackson Brown, Jr.





Other Arthritis-like Diseases (Hepatitis D)

In my last few blogs, I covered many arthritis-like diseases that affect children and/or adults. Today I will discuss Hepatitis D which is a disease that can cause joint pain, but is not classes as arthritis. I explained that arthritis is a general term used to cover over 100 diseases of the musculoskeletal system that affect the joints, muscles, bones, cartilage, and connective tissues.

About Hepatitis D
Hepatitis D is also known as “delta hepatitis.” I is one of the 5 hepatitis viruses which range from Hepatitis A to Hepatitis E. Hepatitis D is a liver disease.  It is not very common in the Unites States. Hepatitis D can only occur among people who have Hepatitis B. Hepatitis D can make the symptoms of Hepatitis B worse. Serious cases of people with chronic Hepatitis B and D can lead to cirrhosis of the liver liver failure, and liver cancer.
Causes
  • Abusing IV or injection drugs
  • Having the Hepatitis B disease
  • Sex with an infected partner
  • Contact with the blood of an infected person
  • Having too many blood transfusions
  • Infected pregnant mothers passing the virus on to their children in childbirth


Symptoms 
  • Fatigue
  • Abdominal pain
  • Dark-colored urine
  • Jaundice
  • Fever
  • Loss of appetite
  • Joint pain
  • Vomiting

Diagnosis
The doctor will most likely do a liver enzyme blood test; an anti-delta agent antibody test, and a liver biopsy to determine if you have the disease.
Treatment
There is no effective vaccine against Hepatitis D, but the vaccine for Hepatitis B works to help restrict the Hepatitis D virus, since the Hepatitis B virus must be present to get Hepatitis D. Some people may end up with a liver transplant.
Prognosis
Most people with Hepatitis D recover in a few weeks, but a small percentage of sufferers go on to develop chronic liver inflammation, which can lead to cirrhosis of the liver.

I hope this information has been helpful.

·         IF THE ABOVE INFORMATION HAS BEEN HELPFUL, PLEASE LEAVE ME A QUESTION OR COMMENT AT: info@askphyllis.com

·         CHECK OUT MY ARCHIVES FOR MORE INFO ABOUT ARTHRITIS TOPICS.

·         STAY TUNED FOR MY NEXT BLOG ON ARTHRITIS

·         DON’T FORGET TO TELL A FRIEND ABOUT MY BLOG

Reference sources include:

www.rightdiagnosis.comhepatotis_d/intro.html













Friday, 22 July 2016

Arthritis Topic This Week (Temporal Arteritis) Other Arthritis-like Diseases
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Thanks to T. Gittins of Lima, Ohio, USA, for sharing
your recipe with Ask Phyllis

Tips and Hints for Daily Living; and Learn an Unusual Word


Read Poems by Phyllis and Other Favorite Authors.

ARTHRITIS
       
“Don’t cry because it’s over. Smile because it happened.”
Dr. Seuss






Other Arthritis-like Diseases (Temporal Arteritis)

In my last few blogs, I covered many arthritis-like diseases that affect children and/or adults. Today I will discuss Temporal Arteritis which is a disease that can cause joint pain, but is not classes as arthritis. I explained that arthritis is a general term used to cover over 100 diseases of the musculoskeletal system that affect the joints, muscles, bones, cartilage, and connective tissues.

About Temporal Arteritis
The temporal arteries, also known as cranial arteries, or giant cell arteries, are the arteries that supply blood to the head and the brain. When the lining of these arteries become inflamed, the condition is known as temporal arteritis, because the condition usually affects the temples mostly. Temporal arteritis is incurable. The disease causes a lack of oxygen and vital nutrients to the head and brain. It can occur in any medium to large-size artery in the body. People over 50 years of all races are more likely to develop this disease. And more women than men are likely to suffer with temporal arteritis. This disease is very common among people of northern European or Scandinavian descent. Temporal arteritis can cause serious complications. Medical treatment should be sought as soon as you suspect you have the disease.
Causes
Although no one knows the exact cause of temporal arteritis, doctors believe that it has to do with the body’s autoimmune response, and also because of certain severe infections. They also link the disease to excessive use of antibiotics.
Symptoms
  • A throbbing headache in the temples
  • Double vision
  • Sudden permanent loss of vision in one eye
  • Weakness
  • Fatigue
  • Weakness
  • Jaw pain which occurs with eating
  • Cough
  • Throat pain
  • Tongue pain
  • Facial pain
  • Fever
  • Loss of appetite
  • Unintentional weight loss
  • Shoulder pain and stiffness
  • Hip pain and stiffness
  • Tenderness in the scalp and temples

Diagnosis
The doctor will examine the scalp and arteries in the patient’s head for signs of tenderness. He will order several blood tests, and a biopsy of the affected artery. He may also order an ultrasound test before making a definitive diagnosis of the disease.
Treatment
There is no cure for temporal arteritis. The goal of the treatment is to reduce the damage inadequate blood flow can cause to the organ. The standard treatment for temporal arteritis is corticosteroids. However, the side effects of long-term use of corticosteroids can increase the risk of developing serious medical conditions such as:
  • Osteoporosis
  • Glaucoma
  • Cataracts
  • Muscle weakness
  • High blood pressure
  • Thinning skin
  • Weight gain
  • Decreased immune system function
  • High blood sugar
  • Easy bruising
  • Restlessness and trouble sleeping at night.

As part of the treatment, doctors also recommend:
  • Quitting smoking
  • Doing weight-bearing exercises like walking
  • Taking Vitamin D supplements
  • Taking 1 aspirin daily
  • Getting regular bone density screenings
  • Occasional blood sugar tests.

Risk Factors Include:
  • Vision loss
  • Developing aneurysms, including aortic aneurysms
  • Damage to other blood vessels
  • Stroke
  • Blindness
  • Eye muscle weakness


Prognosis
There is no cure for temporal arteritis, and even after treatment, the disease can recur. The earlier the disease is diagnosed and treated, the less the damage I will do to other blood vessels. The disease can be fatal if left untreated. But blindness is the most feared results of the disease when it’s left untreated.
I hope this information has been helpful.

  •         IF THE ABOVE INFORMATION HAS BEEN HELPFUL, PLEASE LEAVE ME A QUESTION   OR COMMENT AT: info@askphyllis.com
  •  ·         CHECK OUT MY ARCHIVES FOR MORE INFO ABOUT ARTHRITIS TOPICS.
  •  ·         STAY TUNED FOR MY NEXT BLOG ON ARTHRITIS
  •          DON’T FORGET TO TELL A FRIEND ABOUT MY BLOG


Reference sources include:

www.healthline.com/heath/temporal-arteritis#Treatments5;  https:/wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant-cell-arteritis; rarediseases.org/rare…/arteritis-giant-cell;
www.mayoclinic.org/giant-cell-arteritis...; www.hopkinsvasculitis.org…; www.vasculiisfoundation.org; https://www.healthgrades.com/conditions/temporal-arteritis;